More Cheap Cooking with Charcoal

19
02

2010
12:45

I mentioned the value of storing charcoal as fuel source for cooking after the SHTF. The Prepare Your Family Blog posted a useful post that provides a cheap way to use charcoal that doesn’t use a Volcano Stove.

They claim you can wrap a cardboard box in foil and place the wrapped box on its side, however, the written description becomes a little confusing:

Place some small bricks or other noncombustible material inside upon which you can rest a cookie sheet about two or three inches above the bottom of the box. Place ten burning charcoal briquettes between the bricks (if you need 400 degrees), place the support for your cooking vessels, and then place your bread pans or whatever else you are using on top of the cookie sheet. Prop a foil-covered cardboard lid over the open side, leaving a large crack for air to get in (charcoal needs a lot of air to burn) and bake your bread…

I assumed this was based on a popular box oven that Boy and Girl Scouts make. So I dug around a bit and found a very good site for constructing simple, efficient box ovens that use a tiny amount of charcoal compared to a BBQ grill.

Uncategorized

Comments

Comment from Red Icculus @ 2010.02.21 - 13:26

I am extremely surprised they used charcoal and cardboard with only an aluminum foil insulator. These would have to be 1 or 2-use ovens, unless they could wire together something like oven racks with foil on them. Regardless, this is an expedient cooking solution.

Charcoal is great, but I can’t imagine storing it long-term for cooking. Having several cords of hickory for heating and cooking after conversion in a 55-gallon drum does sound like a viable option.

Comment from admin @ 2010.02.21 - 13:49

I’m using 5 gallon buckets to store charcoal, as from what I can tell, charcoal’s only enemy is moisture. Plus, twenty buckets of briquettes, is a lot smaller than a cord of wood :) When the weather clears, I’m going to experiment with a more permanent oven consisting of brick and earth. Basically, I’ll make a small brick box and cover it with a bunch of dirt for insulation. Then I’ll burn a few briquettes inside to heat the oven, remove the coals and then slip a container of food inside.

Comment from Red Icculus @ 2010.02.21 - 17:09

Ohh, brick and earth sounds way better than a kudge-y oven racks. Cob ovens might be the best for minimal charcoal consumption!

Comment from Steve @ 2010.05.28 - 11:51

I’m using 5 gallon buckets to store charcoal, as from what I can tell, charcoal’s only enemy is moisture. Plus, twenty buckets of briquettes, is a lot smaller than a cord of wood :) When the weather clears, I’m going to experiment with a more permanent oven consisting of brick and earth. Basically, I’ll make a small brick box and cover it with a bunch of dirt for insulation. Then I’ll burn a few briquettes inside to heat the oven, remove the coals and then slip a container of food inside.

Sorry, but you are not allowed to comment.

«

»